Le Corbusier chair and Pierre Jeanneret chair

pierre jeanneret
pierre jeanneret (1896–1967)

Pierre Jeanneret was a Swiss architect who opened an atelier with his cousin, Le Corbusier. Together they designed some of the most famous buildings of the 20th century, such as the Villa Savoye and the Villa La Roche in Paris. Their cooperation ended with World War II, when Le Corbusier supported the Vichy regime and Pierre joined the French Résistance. In 1955 they united again to build the new city of Chandigarh, in the Indian Punjab. Le Corbusier spent relatively little time on the project, but Pierre Jeanneret continued working on it for a further 15 years.

character:

Pierre Jeanneret was in Le Corbusier‘s shadow. However, his interests lay in experimentation rather than success and Chandigarh gave him the opportunity to play, to break away from European architectural dogma.

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Charlotte Perriand
charlotte perriand (1904–1999)

She was a French architect and designer who worked for Le Corbusier and is known for designing the studio’s famous tubular steel furniture. In 1937 she left Le Corbusier’s practice, and in 1940 began collaborating with Jean Prouvé. Around the same time she also went to Japan and began exploring the country‘s rich culture of handcrafts, which inspired her to use more wood in her work and to develop a more subtle language.

character:

Perriand was a free-spirited leftist, who in her search for individual expression abandoned traditional architectural doctine in favour of a more emotional and poetic language. Designing for her was a game but one that had to be taken seriously, and in her work we see a more female approach to design that is based on neither ego nor the need for fame.

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le corbusier
le corbusier (1887–1965)

The most important architect of the 20th century, Le Corbusier developed his own innovative and playful interpretation of rational modernism. His famous definition of architecture as a ‘machine for living’ suggests his approach to design was highly pragmatic, but he was also an artist who believed that buildings should touch our souls. His concept of the ‘promenade architecturale’, for example, was based on the belief that buildings should provoke multiple emotions and experiences.

Character:

He was very ambitious and wanted to build. Still the desire for fame didn’t spoil his way of designing. He believed that buildings should touch our soul and so he gave the buildings a deeper meaning. His work expressed a rich ambivalence between rational and spiritual sides.

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Tom Strala
tom strala (b. 1974)

From an early stage in his career, the Swiss designer Tom Strala has worked in an experimental mode, avoiding both industrial and mass production. Design for him is both an art and a way of interpreting thoughts and ideas. Rather than responding to economic need or the general zeitgeist, he looks for radical design solutions that express his world view and that are often based on contradictions, such as roughness and fragility.

Character:

He is bothered that design is rarely radical. Just because furniture is an object of utility it doesn’t have to act like a consumer good. As designer he’s expressing freedom and loves to reflect all facets of this existential topic.

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jean prouve
jean prouvé (1901–1984)

Jean Prouvé was a French metal worker, self-taught architect and designer, who was fascinated by the aesthetics of technology. He cooperated with Le Corbusier on architecture, and with Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand on furniture. After World War II, when France needed many new buildings, he looked for intelligent, low-cost solutions that could be mass produced. Although pragmatic ideas and design solutions were important to Prouvé, his designs were also often poetic and artistic in character.

CHARAcTER:

Jean Prouvé sought beauty in the banal. Creating all this objects of utilisation he developed an anti-aesthetical aesthetic. He know to show how poor materials can make something rich.

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lina bo bardi
lina bo bardi

An Italian-born architect who spent much of her life in Brazil, Lino Bo Bardi initially worked for the architect and designer Gio Ponti, in Milan. After World War II she left with her husband for a new life in São Paolo, where they became quickly absorbed into artistic and intellectual circles. Her early work was modernist in style, but the emotional and ethnic elements of Brazilian life and architecture gradually influenced her thinking. Much of her design work was experimental as well as spiritual in character, and included both simple houses and Brutalist buildings made of concrete with large dimensions.

Character:

She was a communist, but a bourgeoise one. Full with contradictions she found her own aesthetic, celebrating its freedom.

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jeanneret chair and Le corbusier chair

jeanneret chair and chairs

Jeanneret chair and chairs, lamps, desks and easy chairs to a complete unity together with the city. Le corbusier chandigarh offering chairs, furniture, office cane chairs and all other objects from Jeanneret chair. Le Corbusier chair is design furniture.